News

New study from the IEA
By Knauf Australia on June 28, 2016

The thermal renovation of buildings can play a key role in reducing air pollutants, according to research commissioned by the European Insulation Manufacturers Association (EURIMA).

IEA AIR Knauf

The thermal renovation of buildings can play a key role in reducing air pollutants, according to research commissioned by the European Insulation Manufacturers Association (EURIMA).

The news comes as an International Energy Agency (IEA) report released today reveals that 6.5 million premature deaths every year can be attributed to air pollution.1  

The Clean Air Scenario report, a cost-effective strategy to cut pollutant emissions by more than half, based on existing technologies and proven policies, says: “Without changes to the way that the world produces and uses energy, the ruinous toll from air pollution on human life is set to rise.”

Energy efficient renovation of buildings can contribute to better air quality, says the research for EURIMA.

The study found that particle matter could be cut by up 9% and sulphur dioxide by 6.3% in North Western Europe using a model based on an annual retrofit rate of 2% across 25 European countries from 2005 to 2020 compared with a business-as-usual scenario.2

Using this model research also found that 78,678 life years could be gained across Europe annually; 7,173 cases of persistent chronic bronchitis avoided every year and the annual saved health costs to society could total €6.64 billion.3

“Knauf Insulation has consistently worked to ensure its products contribute to good indoor air quality,” says Vincent Briard, Head of Sustainability at Knauf Insulation.

“Our Glass Mineral Wool with ECOSE Technology, for example, is certified by Eurofins with the highest Gold level, according to Indoor Air Quality emissions regulation. We were the first to receive such a rating.”

Knauf Insulation’s ECOSE Technology solutions also contain no added formaldehyde, no acrylic and no artificial dyes.

“Indoor air quality and issues associated with the health of buildings are becoming increasingly important particularly in the renovation of schools, hospitals and homes for the elderly,” says Vincent. “Today’s IEA report once again highlights the health benefits that can be achieved as a result of cleaner air.”

Click here to read more about the IEA report. 

http://www.iea.org/newsroomandevents/events/name-136675-en.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231012000738
http://lodel.irevues.inist.fr/pollution-atmospherique/index.php?id=4780